Can Bad Teeth Make You Sick?

Can Bad Teeth Make You Sick?

You might think, “Can bad teeth make you sick?” The short answer is yes since your body functions as a team, and problems in one part can cause difficulties in others. You may get stained or decayed teeth and gum disease if you do not care for your teeth. And guess what? Poor oral health is related to many health issues.

Oral Problems Caused by Bad Teeth

Your dentist tells you to care for your teeth and gums, and they are correct! It’s important for more reasons than you would realize. Here are some of the oral problems that poor teeth can cause:

  • Tooth decay and cavities: Poor dental hygiene can cause tooth decay and cavities. If you don’t regularly remove dental plaque, it accumulates on your tooth enamel, causing bacteria, decay, and cavities.
  • Bad Breath: Neglecting dental hygiene can cause bad breath. Bacteria and food particles between the teeth produce compounds such as hydrogen sulfide, which causes halitosis. 
  • Feeling Uncomfortable: Taking care of your teeth can make you feel less uncomfortable and avoid problems with your mouth. Also, your overall health can show in how your mouth feels.
  • Losing Teeth: Not taking good care of your teeth can cause gum disease. This happens when plaque builds up on and under your gums, causing infections. If it gets really bad, it can make your bones weaker and even lead to losing your teeth.

Health Problems Related To Bad Teeth

Taking care of your teeth isn’t just about a winning smile; it’s crucial for your overall health. When teeth decay, harmful bacteria can build up and cause infections that spread through the bloodstream. This can lead to serious health problems. Here are some of the rotten teeth effects on the body.

Heart Health

The bacteria on your gums can travel through the bloodstream, causing plaque to harden in the arteries—a condition called atherosclerosis. This raises the risk of heart attacks. Over time, arteries can become stiff and thick, restricting blood flow and potentially leading to hypertension and strokes.

Arthritis

Having gum infections can make your joints act up! A germ causing long-term gum problems can trigger the same joint issues found in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). People with gum disease are four times more likely to have RA, a disease that harms the joints. Caring for your gums might also be a good way to keep your joints happy.

Erectile Dysfunction

It’s not just women who need to worry about gums affecting their hormonal shifts, men can also face problems. Chronic gum disease can cause erectile dysfunction. If the gums recede and create spaces around the teeth, bacteria can enter the bloodstream, causing inflammation in blood vessels. This inflammation can disturb blood flow to the genital area, making it difficult to get or maintain an erection. 

Infertility

For women, if your gums aren’t in good shape, it might be harder to get pregnant. This is especially true for those with conditions like endometriosis or polycystic ovarian syndrome. 

This answers people’s questions like: Can bad teeth make you sick? So, yes! Men can also have fertility issues if they don’t take care of their teeth, leading to low sperm counts and less healthy semen.

Breathing Problems

Can bad teeth make you sick? Bad oral health can cause breathing issues. Bacteria in your mouth can go to your lungs, and plaque can worsen things. Breathing in tiny drops of saliva with bacteria can affect your lungs. Bacteria from periodontal disease can reach the lungs, causing infections, bronchitis, pneumonia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Sore Throat

When a tooth infection spreads, it can make bacteria travel to the throat, causing irritation and inflammation. People often ask, can bad teeth make you sick? Bad teeth result in cavities, which can cause sore throat, just like a regular infection. If the tooth problem isn’t treated, it can cause more inflammation, affect nerves, and weaken the immune system, worsening the sore throat. 

Cancer

Taking good care of your teeth is important, especially if you smoke. Smoking makes you more likely to get cancers in your mouth and throat. But that’s not all: poor dental health may increase your risk of developing pancreatic cancer, kidney cancer, and blood cancers. 

Tips To Avoid Bad Breath

Poor dental health can lead to various disorders. Here are some strategies to avoid acquiring terrible teeth, which can save you from serious problems.

Brush Twice Per Day:

Remember to wash your teeth in the morning and before bedtime. It’s a simple yet necessary step towards a happy mouth.

Incorporate Fluoride:

Pick a toothpaste with fluoride for your daily brushing routine. Fluoride makes your teeth stronger, stops them from losing important minerals, and protects against cavities. Remember to use fluoride toothpaste every time you brush your teeth. You can also consult your dentist about getting a fluoride treatment at your next cleaning appointment.

Floss daily:

Do not forget to floss between your teeth daily. It helps you keep your teeth and gums fit.

Quit smoking:

Quitting smoking is challenging, but it’s excellent for your teeth. The answer to “can bad teeth make you sick?” is yes. Smoking can lead to various illnesses. Talk to your family doctor for help.

Visit the Dentist:

Regular check-ups are important. Stick to your dentist’s plan for cleanings and check-ups to keep your smile shining.

Reduce Sweet Intake:

We all enjoy treats, but too much sugar isn’t great for your teeth. Enjoy them in moderation, and remember to rinse your mouth or brush your teeth afterward.

Conclusion

Ignoring dental hygiene can result in severe health problems, and one might wonder, “Can bad teeth make you sick?” The answer is yes; poor dental health can contribute to various illnesses. But the positive news is that maintaining oral health is a simple routine with great benefits. If you are looking for dental cleaning services in Montclair, NJ, then contact Dr. Arthur Yeh & Associates.  

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